Returning to his Roots Leads to Adams’ Sprint Title in Paris

By Fullstop Communications

Gqeberha sprinter Luxolo Adams believed that knowing what worked best for him had been the catalyst behind his eye-catching performance in the Paris Diamond League athletics meeting last weekend.

The 25-year-old, who is a member of the Madibaz Athletics Club, scorched to a career-best 19.82 seconds in the 200m as he stunned Olympic champion Andre de Grasse in winning his first Diamond League race.

It is the second fastest any South African has been over that distance, just short of Clarence Munyai’s record of 19.69.

The outcome marked a beacon of hope for the Gqeberha athlete after a few challenging years following his decision to move to Pretoria.

“That did not really work out and in August last year I returned to Gqeberha to resume training with my former coach (Gerrie Posthumus) and that has worked well for me,” said Adams.

“I believe being able to know what works for me and having a coach that knows which boxes to tick have enabled me to produce better performances.

“This, I feel, is the biggest factor that has contributed to me being a sub-20 athlete.”

Adams added that it was a boost for his confidence as he surveyed the journey ahead.

This includes an upcoming meeting in Switzerland where he said he would go down in distance to the 100m to test his speed, and then the World Athletics Championships in the United States in July.

“This performance has definitely lifted me because it is always a good feeling when you get rewarded for hard work,” said Adams.

“It is exciting to run a sub-20 and it will be even more exciting to find the consistency in running fast as I go forward.

“Considering how training has been going I can definitely say I have been expecting such performances.

“It was just a matter of being patient and being confident in my coach and the work we have put in.”

He added that building on the Paris success depended on staying injury-free.

“This is the biggest factor in being able to continue performing at this high level. That means doing the little things that I have been doing to condition my body; so that will yield consistency to my performances and results.

Adams described the Paris moment as the biggest of his career.

“I’ve said this before, records can be broken but titles stay forever.

“So this was a proper highlight and it would even be sweeter if I could run a sub-20 and medal at a major championship, be it the Commonwealth or Olympic Games or world championships.”

Adams and fellow Madibaz field athlete Ischke Senekal, who won shot put gold at the recent Africa champs, have been included in the national team for the worlds in Oregon, United States, from July 15 to 24.

Photo credit: Supplied

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