FNB MADIBAZ RUGBY THUS FAR IN THIS SEASON

By Gina Cossavella

How the FNB Madibaz rugby team have fared in Varsity Shield

Last year the FNB Madibaz rugby team made it to the finals with an undefeated record, losing their only match of the season to Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) in the finals.

Prior to the start of this season, FNB Madibaz planned on making up for last year. Thus far, they have played four matches and have won three. A promising start but one that doesn’t leave room for anymore error, especially if they plan on being promoted back to the Varsity Cup tournament. For our PE boys to get promoted back to the Varsity Cup championship, they need to be the team that accumulates the highest points from both last year and this season.

The first two matches of this season were played on home ground and FNB Madibaz won the first match 25 – 5 against FNB UKZN on 14 February. The hiccup came on 21 February as they lost against FNB WSU 14 – 19. The boys came back with a bang on 28 February to beat FNB Rhodes 0 – 50 in Grahamstown and on 6 March, FNB Madibaz got back at FNB CPUT by beating them 32 – 24.

FNB Madibaz will be travelling to take on FNB TUT 20 March at 19:00 and will be playing their last round-robin match on home ground at 17:00 on 27 March as they take on FNB UFH who beat them earlier in the season.

Keep your eyes on the television and cheer Madibaz on in person to see how they fare in their last two matches, whether they make the final and ultimately get promoted.

Words: 265

CAPTION: FNB Madibaz centre Johan Lombard goes on a run against Rhodes on 28 February 2020. Photo: ASEM Engage

Why the future is female

The 21st century has seen a massive increase in activism and movements. The messages that these groups aim to spread have been given platforms to achieve a wider reach. We are talking about movements like #Blacklivesmatter, #loveislove, #metoo, the list goes on but the focus on this article is on #TheFutureIsFemale. In this short article, we will breakdown the three reasons why the #TheFutureIsFemale exists.

  1. Smartphones

Ever since the telegram, communication evolved immensely. From landlines to mobile phones to smartphones. Smartphones were considered “Smart” because they could multitask. The ability to play music, play games and then pause to reply to a text message. The game started to change (see what I did there).

With Smartphones evolving and getting better and better, so did the apps. The advancements of the apps started to trigger a new way of living. Now people are expected to multitask and do more than before. You can’t just be a traditional marketer anymore, now you must be good at social media, photo and videography editing and graphic design. Yet again the list goes on. [For homework, I would like you to look at the job requirements of a specific position e.g. Marketing assistant, secretary, teacher. Compare today’s requirements for the job and the requirements for the same job 10-15 years ago. You will get a better understanding.]

However, with multitasking being the keyword. It has been proven that females are better at multitasking than their male counterparts, making them well equipped for the future.

2. Speech

When you look around our society today it’s more women that are vocal. I look among my peers and it’s the females that are more vocal. More females have YouTube channels and are active on their social media platforms. More females are fighting for a cause (it’s not just feminism). The males are barely making ripples, I wonder why they are so silent. Don’t they know what silence does?

With my female peers voicing out opinions now, regardless of how right or wrong, their opinions are, they are learning to speak. In five years, they will be better at it as compared to the ‘silent’ male counterparts.

3. Agreeableness

T. A., Livingston, B. A., & Hurst, C. (2012). Do Nice Guys—and <d Gals—Really Finish Last? The Joint Effects of Sex and Agreeableness on Income. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102(2), 390-407.
 

Statistics show that those who score low in agreeableness tend to rise the ladder more as compared to those that score high in agreeableness. Men dominate in the workplace because they tend to score low in agreeableness as compared to their female counterparts that tend to score high in agreeableness. However, the leadership topic has been under close investigation. We need more leaders than mere mangers. The world is lacking in leaders. It has been proven that the most effective leaders score high in agreeableness. As we look for more effective leaders, yet again it is the females that will be better suited to lead the future (Interesting huh?)

In conclusion, when I say “The future is female”, I do not mean it literally but rather the personalities of women have started to prove to be of more value than the old school personality traits that were more male-dominated. I think it is recommended that we learn the skills of both genders and find the best mix. For someone who scores high in agreeableness, you will lose out in negotiations but provide a more motivated and effective environment for your employees or followers. For someone who is not good at multitasking, you will deliver excellent work because of the focus but you will struggle in the modern world that demands a person to be able to multitask.

That is my take on why the future is female. What do you think?

Madibaz prove success story in SWD cricket

The Madibaz cricket team have sent out a message that they are a club to be taken seriously after winning the South Western Districts premier league for the second time.

Based in George, the Nelson Mandela University outfit defeated George Cricket Club by four wickets in the final earlier this month.

This came after the students eliminated defending champions Union Stars by 12 runs in a nail-biting, low-scoring playoff the previous day. After posting only 104, Madibaz restricted Union Stars to 92, thanks to brilliant spin bowling by Joshua Klue (4/9) and Joshua de Ponte (3/15).

It was the first time in a decade that Union Stars, who played in 10 consecutive finals of which they won nine, did not reach the final.

George campus sport manager Hugo Loubser said they were elated with the outcome as it was something they had targeted from the start of the season.

“We previously won the league in 2013-14 and we said to ourselves from the outset that if can get to the final this time, we are capable of matching any of the teams in the league,” he said.

“There are a number of students from schools in the Southern Cape who have decided to study at the George campus as they believe the university can provide the stage for them to perform.

“We are delivering on this and trust that more cricketers will buy into the Madibaz George cricket culture.”

At last year’s University Sport South Africa Week, the Madibaz team, comprising largely of players from the George campus, showed their ability by winning the B section of the tournament.

Loubser said a key driving force in their approach was that “nobody is bigger than the team”.

“The fear of failure does not exist among the players as they know that you will lose some matches. But the key is to turn up for the matches that matter.

“The players also understand their roles and know that responsibility is not something you pass on to the next person.”

He added that the premier league triumph was strong evidence of how cricket had progressed at the George campus.

“In 2007, we played in a ‘merchant’ league, which comprised six matches the entire season,” said Loubser.

“In 2013 we were promoted to the premier league, having won the promotion league.

“We won the premier league in our first season and have remained competitive ever since. Our second team plays in the reserve league.”

Adding to their establishment as a leading club has been the development of its facilities.

“We had the square rebuilt in 2013 and have since added sight screens, redeveloped the artificial nets and built a stand for players,” said Loubser.

“The cricket facility is now often used by SWD Cricket Board as a preferred venue for their SWD Cricket Academy programme.

The George students will now, together with the winners of Western Province and Boland, play in a series of matches from March 29 to 31 to determine the Western Cape representatives for the national club championship in Pretoria from April 13 to 17.

Loubser said there was a positive attitude in the camp ahead of the playoffs.

“This season we often had to face off against more experienced teams with more star players than us,” he said. “So we are looking forward to that challenge.”